Why Should You Register to Vote?

20160202_185418Last week was the National Voter Registration Drive! A lot of you out there may ask: why should I bother registering to vote? What’s the point when my vote won’t really make a difference as nobody cares? As a local councillor, I regularly hear these grievances on the doorsteps, at public meetings and on social media. My response is why wouldn’t you want to exercise a right that people in the past fought – or even in some cases – died for?

I am currently 19 and I remember that exciting moment when I could vote for the first time in 2014; in this case in the European Parliament elections for MEPs. That year also marked me being becoming Staffordshire’s youngest local councillor. I was co-opted onto my local parish council and now have the great honour of representing thousands of residents in my local community. During the general and local elections last May – after which I was successfully re-elected – I was highly disappointed at the lack of young adults at the polling stations. This is a phenomenon that we desperately need to change in the country; a turnout of 58% amongst 18-24 year olds is simply not good enough!

If you’re a young adult – or not far off reaching adulthood – and wondering why you should vote, I am now going to give you some reasons why you should. Read more… 

Don’t be a bystander. Register to Vote.

CaJo0pSWIAAR71cNational Voter Registration Drive (NVRD) is an annual campaign, working together with thousands of people around the UK coordinating local activities through which to engage, inform and inspire their communities to register to vote.

Members from UK Youth Voice talk about the importance of politics, voting and why young people should engage in democracy:

Read what they have to say

Inside the Conservative Party Conference

This year’s Conservative Party Conference was an incredible experience for me as a young adult. There was always an exciting atmosphere wherever you went; whether it be attending a fringe event, watching one of the ministerial speeches, queuing for an event, or just sampling walking around the exhibition zone.

For most of the first two days I based myself in the Youth Zone so I could represent UK Youth at all the various fringe events regarding young people’s issues. One thing that struck me throughout these events was that most of what affects young people is actually the same as the rest of the population: it just has to be articulated in a different way.

It was a great pleasure to shadow the CEO of UK Youth, Anna Smee. At the events she gave some excellent answers about the skills young people need in our increasingly digitised global economy. Conservative MP Chloe Smith, who is an outstanding advocate of youth affairs in Parliament, also did an excellent job of chairing the many panel discussions.

Read more about Joe’s time at the Conservative Conference

Inside the Labour Party Conference

Topics Discussed

One of the highlights of the day was discussing ‘if you could ask Jeremy Corbyn to change one thing, what would it be?’ I only wish Mr Corbyn could have been in the room to hear the passion and conviction of the answers. A lot of the group felt quite strongly about university alternatives – they thought uni was very expensive, considering graduates can struggle to find jobs. They also said that the pay for entry level jobs often isn’t enough for them to support themselves without the help of their parents. Young people want to have solid alternatives to further their education where they feel ‘valued and respected’, and are able to sustain themselves without having to live in poverty.

Find out more about Hydie’s time at the Labour Party Conference

Inside the Liberal Democrats Party Conference

What happens when you take young people from different areas and organizations and throw in some politicians? Well the result will shock you as it shocked me. At the Liberal Democrats party conference in Bournemouth there was no shortage of young people who were passionate and enthusiastic to make their voices heard by the people who could make a difference.

As part of the Youth Zone event party members and youth charities got together to debate policies for young people. I joined the charity UK Youth and O2 Think Big to discuss Education and Skills with Lord Storey and Lorely Burt who lead for the party on those areas. I had concerns about opportunities and programs to help young people become more confident and teach them life skills that truly matter and the truth is I thought I was the only one. In fact the majority of people I spoke to and heard from had the same views.

Find out more about Connor’s time at the Liberal Democrats Party Conference